Swine flu vaccine: criminal complaint against STIKO


Swine flu vaccination: accusation of bodily harm against STIKO

The criticism of the mass vaccination in the context of swine flu led to a criminal complaint and a criminal complaint with the Berlin Public Prosecutor's Office on January 14, 2010 against the Standing Vaccination Commission (STIKO) at the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and against unknown persons. On the basis of information from the European Regulatory Authority (EMEA), the online magazine LifeGen.de claims to accuse the Stiko of physical injury, ill-treatment of those under protection and violations of the drug law.

According to this, the Pandemrix vaccine from the pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline is said to have received approval in May 2008 before the swine flu outbreak. According to LifeGen.de, it was tested on 240 adults, but probably never on children.

For the latter, however, it was recommended by the STIKO as tolerable, the magazine criticizes. Furthermore, LifeGen.de states that the information from the EMEA confirms that “a test phase of the vaccine regarding side effects and tolerability only started during the vaccination campaign”. This leads to the allegation that people who were ready to be vaccinated were not properly informed about the state of research on the drug. The LifeGen.de website also states that “normally, effective doses and studies on possible risks must be known exactly before approval”.

In the USA, over 7800 cases of vaccine side effects and 33 suspected deaths are said to have been reported via the electronic Vaccine Reporting System (VAERS). According to LifeGen.de, this could lead to those affected filing a class action lawsuit to assert claims for damages.

There is also further interest in clearing up the allegations from a financial point of view. LifeGen.de reports that, according to the Senate Administration, the RKI was only able to update its vaccination recommendation after the start of the vaccination so that a single vaccination is sufficient as protection against A / H1N1.

LifeGen.de writes that "this amended recommendation (...) created excess vaccine capacities (...)".

If you now consider that almost half of the 9.6 million doses of vaccine delivered in November are left and a further 34 million doses of vaccine for, according to media reports, will be delivered by March 2010 for almost 300 million euros, then there is a possible question of blame these costs are not uninteresting. LifeGen.de calls the vaccination against swine flu recommended by the STIKO and propagated by the Federal Minister of Health Philipp Rösler (FDP) a "large-scale experiment". (Thorsten Fischer, naturopath osteopathy, January 20, 2010)

Author and source information



Video: Swine Flu Vaccines Pulled From Canada


Previous Article

Sudden Infant Death: Cause Serotonin Deficiency?

Next Article

Successful therapy for chronic nightmares